New York at a glance


Population by race and Hispanic origin

Full-time law enforcement staff, New York City Police Department

  • 34,018 Officers
  • 16,065 Civilian staff

Full-time law enforcement staff per 1,000 residents

  • 6.03 New York
  • 3.1 National average, cities with 250,000+ population
  • 2.8 National average

These figures reflect the New York City Police Department only, and do not include state or other police agencies that may be present in this location.

Federal grant funding

Data was last updated April 28, 2022


We identified over $810.8M in federal grant funding, FY 2012-2022

Grant funding over time

Grant funding by federal department

Recent grants

USA spending grants for: New York
Amount Start and end dates Recipient and description Awarding agency CFDA program Type
$4,095,916.00 10/01/2020
09/30/2024
NEW YORK, CITY OF REDUCING VIOLENT CRIME, ENFORCING FIREARM LAWS, ENHANCING OFFICER SAFETY AND WELLNESS, AND STRENGTHENING COLLABORATIVE PROSECUTION BETWEEN PROSECUTORS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT SAFETY. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs 16.738 Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program Prime
$11,563,600.00 07/01/2020
06/30/2023
NEW YORK, CITY OF CHP Department of Justice Offices, Boards and Divisions 16.710 Public Safety Partnership and Community Policing Grants Prime
$3,858,884.00 10/01/2018
09/30/2022
NEW YORK, CITY OF NEW YORK CITY 2019 JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs 16.738 Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program Prime
$4,072,043.00 10/01/2017
09/30/2021
NEW YORK, CITY OF NEW YORK CITY 2018 JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs 16.738 Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program Prime

View all grants

Military Equipment Transfers

Data last updated April 4, 2022


$1.5M value of military equipment has been transferred to the New York City Police Department

The highest-value stock number reported is MINE RESISTANT VEHICLE with 1 item valued at $865,000.00 each

Recent equipment transfers

Military equipment transfers
Ship date Item and National Stock Number (NSN) Quantity Acquisition value, each Acquisition value, total DEMIL code DEMIL IC
1/18/2017 MINE RESISTANT VEHICLE
2355-01-553-4634
1 1 @ $658,000.00 $658,000.00 C 1
3/9/2016 MINE RESISTANT VEHICLE
2355-01-602-3357
1 1 @ $865,000.00 $865,000.00 C 1

Local police misconduct data, consent decrees, and settlements

Data was last updated January 25, 2022


NYCLU - NYPD Misconduct Complaint Database

The NYPD Misconduct Complaint Database, which the NYCLU obtained through Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) requests, is a repository of complaints made by the public on record at the CCRB. These complaints span two distinct periods: the time since the CCRB started operating as an independent city agency outside the NYPD in 1994 and the prior period when the CCRB operated within the NYPD. The database includes 279,644 unique complaint records involving 102,121 incidents and 48,757 active or former NYPD officers. The database does not include pending complaints for which the CCRB has not completed an investigation as of April 2021.

NYCLU - NYPD Misconduct Complaint Database

Settlements

We identified 5 publicly reported settlements that resulted in policy changes and $947,767,500.00 in monetary compensation to victims.

Settlements
Year Description Outcome
2021

A group of plaintiffs was awarded $750,000 on claims of injury caused by “sound cannons” during protests following the death of Eric Garner in 2014.

Under the settlement agreement in this excessive force case, the New York City Police Department also agreed to stop the use of the high-frequency “deterrent” or “alert” tone on its long-range acoustic devices, which the department has used in the past primarily to communicate with large crowds.

Policy changes Compensation
$750,000.00
2020

New settlement to prohibit NYPD from removing hijabs in police custody.

A settlement agreement prohibiting the New York Police Department from removing detainees’ hijabs while in police custody was reached on November 5, 2020, nearly two years after a lawsuit was filed in 2018.

The lawsuit may also have implications for police policies in Yonkers. The 2018 lawsuit claimed that it was illegal for the NYPD to remove religious attire for mugshots. Monetary settlements for the plaintiffs have yet to be reached.

Policy changes
2020

Johanna Pagan-Alomar, a Bronx resident, will receive $1.25 million to resolve a lawsuit against the NYPD, stemming from a 2018 incident that left Pagan-Alomar without her left eye.

The Pagan-Alomar settlement represents only one of the multimillion-dollar settlements against the NYPD this year. In 2019, New York City spent more than $68 million in settlements in response to over 1,000 lawsuits.

Compensation
$1,250,000.00
2020

In July 2021, the City of New York agreed to pay $567,500 to Tomas Medina, who had filed a complaint against the New York Police Department (NYPD) alleging that he was put in an illegal chokehold by an NYPD officer in 2018. The city will pay $562,500 and the officer will contribute $5,000 out of his own pocket.

The complaint, filed with the Civilian Complaint Review Board, alleged that former detective Fabio Nunez had placed Medina in a chokehold and tased him 13 times when responding to a noise complaint. At the time, choke holds had been banned by the police department. Since beginning as an officer, Nunez has been named in several lawsuits alleging excessive force and other forms of misconduct. After attempting to have the case dismissed, a district judge ruled that the city and NYPD officials could be held liable, leading the city to settle for $567,500.

Compensation
$567,500.00
2010 - 2019

Between 2010 and 2014, New York City spent $601.3 million on police misconduct cases, and spent nearly $270 million on police misconduct claims in fiscal years 2017 and 2018.

In 2015, The Wall Street Journal released an analysis of settlement totals from instances of police misconduct among the ten largest local police departments in the nation. Many of the cases involved in the analysis involved alleged beatings, shootings, and wrongful imprisonment. The analysis determined that, between 2010 and 2014, New York City spent $601.3 million on police misconduct cases. In 2015, the city paid $5.9 million to the estate of Eric Garner, who died after being put in a police chokehold. Additionally, a report released by the New York City Comptroller’s Office disclosed that the city spent nearly $270 million to resolve police misconduct claims in fiscal years 2017 and 2018. A recent analysis of data published by the New York City Law Department, detailing information on civil actions alleging police misconduct, showed that in 2019 the city was responsible for over $68 million in payouts to resolve nearly 1,400 civil lawsuits filed against the department.

Compensation
$945,200,000.00